How Do You Address Physician Burnout?

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How Do You Address Physician Burnout?

Most doctors and healthcare professionals are perpetually under work pressure. Whether you call it the nature of their job or the scarcity of resources, physicians often struggle to strike balance between patients safety and individual health.

Most doctors tend to ignore their own wellbeing pushing themselves to the point of complete drain out. Physical burnout has become a common phenomenon in medical clinics, hospitals, and other healthcare institutions.

As per a new Stanford research, the growing physician burnout is potentially a source of medical negligence or errors that supersedes even unsafe working conditions in the United States.

Through the research was done at a small scale, it does give an insight into how physician burnout is tightening the noose around the health care professionals.

“We also know from our previous work that both burnout and medical errors independently double the risk of suicidal thoughts among physicians,” says Tait Shanafelt, MD, director of the Stanford WellMD Center and associate dean of the School of Medicine.

Many previous studies have reinforced the current findings connecting the impact of physician burnout on their workplace behavior, quality medical care, turnover rates and overall satisfaction of the patients.

The Recourse To Ideal Physician Behavior

A survey from the Institute for Safe Medication Practices reported some 40% of hospital staff failed to report issues surrounding medication fearing the doctor, and in a result,  7% of them fell to medical negligence.

The first and foremost step is to acknowledge that physicians can get exhausted and feel tired in the workplace. Often, physicians turn blind eye to the visible signs of poor health.

However, that is certainly not the best option that can take you far.

The burnout symptoms include irritation, cynicism, exhaustion and more. It all culminates to physicians losing control over their usual behavior in front of colleagues, nurses, and other staff members.

If you are a victim of burnout yourself or witnessing disruptive physicians in your workplace, it’s time to take certain corrective measures:

  • Talk It Out

Most physicians are reluctant to report any work-related pressure to their seniors or to the HR. At least not in the first instant itself.  In such a situation, they can talk it out with any colleague or mentor to reduce the anxiety and get some tips to counterbalance. If the need arises, you can approach your supervisor to share any major work-related issues affecting your performance and behavior.

  • Official Notification

Most health care institutes have specially designated HR personnel to deal with workplace safety issues. Whether it is something related to the physicians or the internal system, notify the authorized person in writing explaining the entire situation or incident.

It’s important to address the work environment that leads to burnout among health care providers to maximize workplace safety.

Any delay or reluctance to do so serves no purpose. It only jeopardizes the entire blueprint to address disruptive physician behavior in a healthcare system.

Be proactive to ensure the situation does not go out of hand, and dealt with utmost considerations to reestablish conducive working conditions for physicians, nurses, staff as well as patients too.

  • Special Unit

Most healthcare organizations are growing vigilant of disruptive physician behavior. It may not look sufficient on the surface but concerted efforts are made out to address burnout amongst doctors, and other medical staff.

From arranging special counseling to de-stress therapy, well-calculated measures are configured to attend to the unwarranted behavioral issues.

In many medical institutes, there is a well laid down policy to communicate and combat disruptive physicians. If you are anyhow feeling hesitant, follow the official protocol for the larger good of everyone.

Seek Professional Help From The Disruptive Physician

In situations, wherein you feel external help from certified professionals would be a better step to take, then Dr. DeLaRosa and his highly qualified and trained team could provide suitable solutions to address the disruptive behavior disorder amongst physicians.

 

FILL THE FORM or Call at (404) 734-8255 to get assistance for your medical organization.

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